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The styles of Indian medieval painting schools formed according to the local traditions but Iranian and Central Asian painting influenced it much. There are some European traces in it as well.

CENTRAL INDIAN PAINTING
The earliest central Indian pictures to survive were executed during the fifth or sixth centuries in the Buddhist cave-temples of Bagh at the southern end of Malwa. In style they evince the rounded elegance and delight in physical grace associated with the parallel art of Ajanta. Malwa evoked some of the most vital developments in Indian art.

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GARHWAL PAINTING
Garhwal painting has never had the same prestige as that of Kangra. Its fame was local. Its style had few, if any, offshoots. Even in terms of time, its exquisite flowering was limited to a bare thirty years and was overlaid a little later by pictures more typical of Kangra than of Garhwal itself.

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KANGRA PAINTING
Kangra painting one of the greatest schools of Indian art. This school had produced some of the most poetic and romantic pictures ever painted in India. It possesses flowing rhythmical line, simple unaffected naturalism, predilection for lovely feminine forms, above all, air of innocent sexuality.

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MUGHAL PAINTING
Mughal painting arose through the teaching of Persian artists, but the pupils did not paint like Persians. It borrowed even more freely from Europe than from Persia, but it remained true in essence to Indian traditional ideals, which asserted themselves more and more till the foreign borrowings became little more than reminiscences.

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PAINTING OF THE DECCAN
The painting of the Islamic kingdoms of the Deccan was of a different order. The cool and subtle refinement which it communicates is unique in Indian painting. Colour, as always in the Deccan, plays the major role. The bland and luminous clarity of the tones, wonderfully lit by the gold ground, will be familiar to cultivators of the gallica rose.

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RAJPUT PAINTING
The evolution of Rajput painting is vitally connected with the older tradition of Gujarati paintings. The Gujarati school was, in fact, only the most flourishing branch of the northern Indian painting in the fifteenth and early sixteenth century. It served as a bridge for the introduction to Rajputana of certain Persian elements.

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